FrontPage 2000 in the Classroom is produced by ACT360 Media Ltd.
in conjunction with Microsoft Corporation.
Copyright 1999. All rights reserved.


blip By now, the 6th graders had produced a basic Web site and was close to launching it on the Internet. But wait! Something was missing. Anyone know what that was?

pixel Yes, Ms. Grzlber? Communication, you say? 'Cause that's what makes the Internet so powerful?

blip Take a bow, Ms. Grzlber. That's right! The kids realized that their Web report could present information and get information back! So the class added a Web survey form that asked their visitors to make their own predictions for the future.

pixel The kids used radio buttons to create multiple-choice questions. You know, for people in a rush? They also included a scrolling text box so visitors could type detailed descriptions. Pretty smart for turn of the millennium!




 


    You can collect information from your Web site visitors by using "forms." These special tools allow you to conduct surveys and tests, collect names and addresses, and even sell products over the Internet.

    Radio buttons are useful when you want your visitor to choose only one option from a list. For example, you can use radio buttons to create multiple-choice tests where examinees are expected to choose only one answer from a list of four options.

Tricky question, huh?

    To add radio buttons:

    1) Type a question. For example: Which word means "a period of 1,000 years"? Then press the Enter key.

    2) Click Insert on the Menu bar and choose Form, then Radio Button. A radio button appears on your page along with two larger buttons that say "Submit" and "Reset." Your cursor is between the radio button and the Submit button.

Select Form, then Radio Button.

    3) Type your text for Option 1. For example: century. Then press the Enter key.

Type some text for the radio button.

    4) Click Insert on the Menu bar and choose Form, then Radio Button. A second radio button appears.

    5) Type your text for Option 2. For example: millennium. Then press the Enter key.

    6) Repeat Step 4 with the text for Option 3. Then press the Enter key.



    TIP: Your form will only work after your Web site is on the Internet. It does not work when your Web site documents are on your own computer only.

 


 

    You can use check boxes when you want someone to select more than one option from a list. For example:

'Check' them out! Har!

    To add a check box:

    1) Click Insert on the Menu bar and choose Form, then Check Box. A check box appears on the page.

Choose Form, then Check Box.

    2) Type your text. For example: basketball.

Type a label.

    3) Press the Enter key.



    TIP: When you add other form elements - like text boxes and check boxes - make sure the "Submit" and "Reset" buttons are at the end of the form. All other questions and form buttons must go above the "Submit" and "Reset" buttons. Your Web site visitors use these buttons to send their information to you over the Internet.

 


 
    A one-line text box provides a place for your visitor to enter one line of text. For example:

A one-line text box.

    To add a one-line text box:

    1) Type a label for the text box. For example: E-mail address. Then press the Enter key.

    2) Click Insert on the Menu bar and choose Form, then One-Line Text Box. A one-line text box appears on the page.

Insert a one-line text box.

    A scrolling text box provides a place for your visitors to enter a comment or message.

A scrolling text box.

    To add a scrolling text box:

    1) Type a label for the text box. For example: Comments.

    2) Click Insert on the Menu bar and choose Form, then Scrolling Text Box. A scrolling text box appears on the page.

Use this command to add a scrolling text box.

    TIP: To resize a one-line text box or scrolling text box, click on the box. Resizing dots appear on the corners and edges of the box. Position the cursor over one of the resizing dots until it turns into a two-way arrow. Then click and drag your mouse to resize the text box.